Creekfire Native American Crafts

Skip to Main Content »

Search Site
Welcome to Creekfire!

You're currently on:

Osage and Walnut Wood Jar with Lid

Double click on above image to view full picture

Zoom Out
Zoom In

More Views

Osage and Walnut Wood Jar with Lid

Availability: Out of stock.

$68.00

Quick Overview

Osage and Walnut Wood Covered Bowl


This artist, who is a verified member of a Muskogee Creek Native American tribe, offers FREE SHIPPING.

Share on Facebook Email this item to a friend

Product Description

This bowl has a contrasting Osage wood bottom and dark Walnut wood top. It measures 5 inches wide and 3.5 inches high -- including with lid.


Walnut wood comes from the American Black Walnut tree, and is prized for its rich, dark brown heartwood and nearly white sapwood.  Wood from these trees can contain straight or distinctively figured grain patterns.  Walnut wood is also prized for its durability.  The wood is hard, strong, and has good decay resistance. 


Osage wood comes from a small tree native to North America. European settlers spread this tree across the continent because it was prized anywhere agriculture and grazing animals were found.  They planted it for field hedges because the dense growth and tough wood made easy fences.  It is a member of the mulberry family and the only species in its genus.  The Osage tree produces a bitter, milky sap which contains latex.  First discovered by Europeans in the Red River Valley (OK), it was named after the Osage Native American tribe living there.  Wood from this tree quickly became popular because it was a tough, dense wood and ideal for making durable bows, handles, war clubs, and other tools.


 

Additional Information

Wood Types Walnut
Finish Lacquer
Dimensions 5 inches wide X 3 1/2 inches high with lid
 

My Cart

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Compare Products

You have no items to compare.

We acceot PayPal and offer Free Shipping!
Hand-made, authentic Native American arts and crafts!

Community Poll

Did you know about the Muskogee Creek Indians before visiting this site?